What are STI/STD's

Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) are very common. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates nearly 20 million new sexually transmitted infections occur every year in the United States(1). Each of these infections is a potential threat to an individual's immediate and long-term health and well-being. If you have been sexually active you may already have a STI and not know it. If you have had sexual contact without using condoms or other barriers your risk is heightened, but even if you are using condoms you can still get an STI.

We offer testing and treatment plans for 2 of the most common STIs, Chlamydia and Gonorrhea, along with evidence-based medical education for our patients. Patients who request STI testing will be charged a minimal lab fee of $10 (Cash only). If you cannot afford the lab fee, please contact us. Testing is important and private.

Students - You don’t need to bring your parents or have insurance.

(1)CDC – National Center for Health Statistics – Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Adolescents and Young Adults. Cdc.gov/std/life-stages-populations/adolescents-youndadults.htm. August 4, 2016.

Chlamydia

  • Chlamydia is the most reported STD in the United States, according to the CDC.
  • Chlamydia is spread by having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with an infected partner. Condoms do not always protect you from contracting Chlamydia.
  • While Chlamydia may not have any symptoms, it can cause life-long permanent damage to a woman’s reproductive system. If symptoms are present, they can include an abnormal vaginal or penile discharge and/or burning sensation while urinating. Chlamydia can be cured with the correct treatment, but you can get a repeat infection if you continue to have sex with an infected partner.
  • The ONLY way to avoid STDs is to not have vaginal, anal, or oral sex. If you do choose to have sex, being in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has tested negative for STDs can significantly lower your chances of getting chlamydia.
  • If you are sexually active outside a long-term mutually monogamous relationship, you risk getting chlamydia. We can test for chlamydia and offer additional education.

Reference: CDC – National Center for Health Statistics – Chlamydia – CDC Fact Sheet. Cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/stdfact-chlamydia.htm. May 19, 2016.

Gonorrhea

  • Gonorrhea is a very common STI, especially among men and women between the ages of 15 and 24 years old.
  • Gonorrhea is spread by having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with an infected partner. It can affect both men and women by infecting the genitals, rectum, or throat.
  • Many times, gonorrhea does not have any symptoms but if left untreated can lead to life-long complications. Women with untreated gonorrhea can develop pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which can lead to chronic pain, infertility, and ectopic pregnancies. Men with untreated gonorrhea can develop a painful condition in the tubes attached to the testicles.
  • The ONLY way to avoid STDs is to not have vaginal, anal, or oral sex. If you do choose to have sex, being in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has tested negative for STDs can significantly lower your chances of getting gonorrhea.
  • If you are sexually active outside a long-term mutually monogamous relationship, you risk getting gonorrhea. We can test for gonorrhea and offer additional education.

Reference: CDC – National Center for Health Statistics – Gonorrhea – CDC Fact Sheet. Cdc.gov/std/gonorrhea/stdfact-gonorrhea.htm. May 19, 2016.